Posts Tagged ‘L’

Osho

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If you clean the floor with love,
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you have given the world
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an invisible painting.”
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– Osho
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The Nine-Step Method for Transforming Trauma: Peter Levine

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The first thing is to create a sense of relative safety. You have to help the person feel just safe enough to begin to go into their bodies.
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Then, from that sense of relative safety created by the therapist and the environment, we help the person to support initial exploration and acceptance of sensations. And we do it, again, only a little bit at a time, so they “touch into their sensations” then come back into the room, into themselves.
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“From that sense of relative safety created by the therapist and the environment, we help the person to support initial exploration and acceptance of sensations.” The third step is a process I call “pendulation.” That’s a word I made up – what it means is that when people first begin to experience their body sensations, they actually feel worse for a moment. It is probably largely because they have avoided their sensations. So when they feel them, they feel worse.
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This is like a contraction. But what I have discovered is when you help support people, they discover that with every contraction there is an expansion. So if they learn to stay with these sensations just momentarily long enough, it will contract but then it will expand. And the rhythm between contraction and expansion, that gives people the sense of, “Oh my God, I’m going to be able to master this!” you know?
“Pendulation is the rhythm between contraction and expansion . . . titration is about carefully touching into the smallest drop of survival-based arousal.”
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So, again, when they get the sense or rhythm of contraction/expansion, it needn’t then become threatening. It just becomes, “Oh, okay, I’m contracting, and now I’m expanding.”
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The fourth step, which is really the first, and the second, and the third, and the fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh and eighth, is what I call “titration.” And by titrating, by just dosing one small amount of experience at a time, this creates an increase in stability, resilience, and reorganization of the nervous system. So titration is about carefully touching into the smallest drop of survival-based arousal.
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Dr. Buczynski: So sort of like a homeopathic approach to trauma? A homeopathic dose level of approaching body experiences?
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Dr. Levine: Yes! Yes, that’s it! Yes, that is a really good analogy – and it may be more than just an analogy. You know, we have a number of homeopaths, particularly in the European and South American trainings – and, you know, they get it, they really get it; you know, the idea of the smallest amount of stimulus that get the body engaged in its own self-defense mechanisms.
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Then the fifth step is to provide corrective experiences by helping them have active experience that supplants or contradicts the passive response of collapse and helplessness. So as they recover active responses, they can feel empowered – they develop active defensive responses.
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“As they recover active responses, they can feel empowered – they develop active defensive responses.” When animals are in the immobility response, when they are in the shut-down state, it’s normally time-limited.
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Continued in response section.
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Feel free to live without regard for being right or wrong or boring and neutral!!


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Mindfulness allows us to live parts of our life free, empty, open and expansive.
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As we clear more debris from the amygdala, our journey to empty the mind becomes more and more prevalent.
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The trained mind does not continue to resist forever.
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The mind will stop doing back flips, chasing this negative emotion or that scary storyline.
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The mind empty, alert and aware can be our default position in due time.
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Less and less attention directed at irrational thought allows the mind to empty, focus and perceive now in its entirety.
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The goal is to quiet the “Ego” enough so our spirit, soul, inner guide, or intuition occupies full attention.
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Sit today, quiet down, focus, let go, accept, grow, chase happy with me.
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It is a community journey.
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Feeling excited or being a constant worrier is a choice of attention, yes, where we place our attention more precisely!

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Richard Davidson:

“One of the most promising forms of neurally based therapy arises from my basic discovery about the patterns of brain activity that underlie depression:

• People with higher left than right prefrontal activity feel a greater sense of well-being and contentment, while those who have higher right than left prefrontal activity often suffer from depression.

In addition, people who have greater baseline levels of left prefrontal activation score high on something called behavioral activation, which is a measure of the strength of what psychologists have called approach motivation.

People with high behavioral activation scores strongly agree with statements such as “When I get something I want, I feel excited and energized” and “When I want something, I usually go all out to get it.”

• People who have greater baseline levels of right prefrontal activation score high on behavioral inhibition, which is a measure of anxiety and the propensity to “shut down” in the face of adversity.

Behaviorally inhibited people agree strongly with such statements as “I worry about making mistakes” and “Criticism or scolding hurts me quite a bit.”
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The mind can alter, change, form new junctions, increase or decrease grey matter density.

So let’s change our mind like we do our clothes.
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