A day in the life of a PTSD guy

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Days have many moods, many different scenarios, a plethora of feelings in the kaleidoscope of life.

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At one moment life has opportunity, the next desperation, then the PTSD mind feels like a victim.

Victims do not win, do not think positively, do not enjoy happiness.

Victims rely on a bank of excuses and attacks, taking action, striving to heal never happens.

Days evolve in compartments, all separate from the previous.

Emotions ebb and flow as scenarios unfold.

We all control our contact with the external world to some degree.

After necessities, work, church, etc., where do you invest your time?

How much PTSD risk do we take?

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Ptsd people avoid what normal people flock to in droves.

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How do we invest our free time?

How much do we refuse to engage?

What makes a difference? What are the criteria for taking risks?

How hard is it to go out when triggered?

Can you force yourself?

What are the euphoric feelings when you face your fears?

Do you feel connected to others who suffer like you do?
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3 responses to this post.

  1. Posted by rudid96 on March 22, 2022 at 11:06 pm

    This blog post describes perfectly the life of a person living alongside trauma. Life is parceled out. I may begin the day grounded but must remain vigilant. Anything or anyone may shatter the careful calm I’ve worked so hard to cultivate. Every moment can be tinged with anxiety. I feel more comfortable with people that understand PTSD and C-PTSD. Adorning the public mask can be weary. I can be spontaneous and just as quickly retreat in silence. I can laugh freely or be consumed by the desire to self-harm. Being authentic is an ongoing process. Being in fellowship with others that are actively working at coping with life while navigating trauma is bonding. I need space, alone time, and exercise. Listening daily to carefully selected trauma coaches helps me balance and feel less isolated.
    What are the criteria for taking risks? Time, proven reliability, support, shame deflectors.
    How hard is it to go out when triggered? I’ve learned to cope by dissociating. I tuck it all in and when alone, fall apart. It manifests later as depression and self-harm

  2. Pure wisdom

    Thank you

  3. […] “This blog post describes perfectly the life of a person living alongside trauma. Life is parceled out. ( this is the referenced post, https://cptsdawayout.com/2022/03/22/a-day-in-the-life-of-a-ptsd-guy/ […]

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