PTSD brain 🧠 versus a non-traumatized Brain!

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First, Ptsd brains wire differently, survival from danger takes priority over-attachment and opportunity.

Second thought patterns could not be more opposite.

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https://unsplash.com/@gasparuhas

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A non traumatized brain seeks attachment, opportunity and ways to fulfill desire.

A PTSD brain has intrusive thoughts, rapid-fire trauma thoughts, dangerous thoughts, lethal threat-type thoughts.

Spotting danger, developing worry, learning to avoid become daily actions.

A non traumatized brain hunts for pleasure and attachment, a Ptsd brain does the opposite.

One is open and flexible the PTSD brain is closed off and rigid.

The traumatized brain suffers more issues, more injuries, and more diseases.

We die younger from the stress and damage to the body and organs.

Check out the Adverse Childhood Experience study on abused kids.

https://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/aces/index.html

It is our reaction to the symptoms of PTSD that damages our mind and body.

Avoidance, hypervigilance, flashbacks, intrusive thoughts, and panic attacks make a three-alarm fire inside our heads.

A non traumatized brain feels more at peace, more worthy and more open.

16 responses to this post.

  1. Adverse childhood experiences, or ACEs, are potentially traumatic events that occur in childhood (0-17 years). For example:

    experiencing violence, abuse, or neglect
    witnessing violence in the home or community
    having a family member attempt or die by suicide
    Also included are aspects of the child’s environment that can undermine their sense of safety, stability, and bonding, such as growing up in a household with:

    substance use problems
    mental health problems
    instability due to parental separation or household members being in jail or prison
    ACEs are linked to chronic health problems, mental illness, and substance use problems in adulthood. ACEs can also negatively impact education, job opportunities, and earning potential. However, ACEs can be prevented.

    Please note the examples above are not meant to be a complete list of adverse experiences. There are many other traumatic experiences that could impact health and wellbeing.

  2. Posted by rudid96 on March 21, 2022 at 1:44 pm

    I’ve so many checks and partial checks on the given list. Sometimes I’ve convinced myself that it wasn’t ‘that’ bad. However, the sum total equals the same results. Age doesn’t lighten the list.

  3. Our judgments confuse us

  4. As a non-diagnosed ‘neuro-divergent’ boy with autism spectrum disorder, ACEs and high sensitivity (thus not always easy to deal with), the first and most formidable authority-figure abuser with whom I was terrifyingly trapped was my Grade 2 teacher, Mrs. Carol, in the early 1970s.

    Although I can’t recall her abuse against me in its entirety, I’ll nevertheless always remember how she had the immoral audacity — and especially the unethical confidence in avoiding any professional repercussions — to blatantly readily aim and fire her knee towards my groin, as I was backed up against the school hall wall. Fortunately, though, she missed her mark, instead hitting the top of my left leg.

    While there were other terrible teachers, for me she was uniquely traumatizing, especially when she wore her dark sunglasses when dealing with me.

    I didn’t tell anyone about my ordeal with her. Rather than consciously feel victimized, I felt some misplaced shame. And as each grade passed, I increasingly noticed how all recipients of corporeal handling/abuse in my school were boys; and I had reasoned thus normalized to myself that it was because men can take care of themselves and boys are basically little men.

    For some other (albeit likely NT) students back then and there, however, there was Mrs. Carol’s sole Grade 2 counterpart, Mrs. Clemens — similarly abusive but with the additional bizarre, scary attribute of her eyes abruptly shifting side to side. Not surprising, the pair were quite friendly with each other. It was rumored the latter teacher had a heroin addiction, though I don’t recall hearing of any solid proof of that.

    I remember one fellow second-grader’s mother going door to door in my part of town seeking out any other case of a student who, like her son, had been assaulted by that teacher. Meanwhile, I just stood there, silently, as my astonished mother conversed with the woman while unaware of my own nightmare-teacher experiences.

  5. I used to be one of those who, while sympathetic, would look down on those who’d ‘allowed’ themselves to become addicted to alcohol and illicit drugs. Yet, though I have not been personally affected by the opioid addiction/overdose crisis, I myself have suffered enough unrelenting ACE-related hyper-anxiety to have known, enjoyed and appreciated the great release upon consuming alcohol and/or THC.

    Often societally overlooked is that intense addiction usually does not originate from a bout of boredom, where a person repeatedly consumed recreationally but became heavily hooked — and homeless, soon after — on an unregulated often-deadly chemical that eventually destroyed their life and even those of loved-ones.

    Emotional and/or psychological trauma from unhindered toxic abuse usually results in a helpless child’s brain improperly developing. If allowed to continue for a prolonged period, it can act as a starting point into a life in which the brain uncontrollably releases potentially damaging levels of inflammation-promoting stress hormones and chemicals, even in non-stressful daily routines. It’s like a form of non-physical-impact brain damage.

    The lasting mental pain is very formidable yet invisibly confined to inside one’s head. It is solitarily suffered, unlike an openly visible physical disability or condition, which tends to elicit sympathy/empathy from others. It can make every day a mental ordeal, unless the turmoil is treated with some form of medicating, either prescribed or illicit.

    Therefore, neglecting people dealing with debilitating drug addiction should never have been an acceptable or preferable political option. But the callous politics typically involved with addiction funding/services likely reflect conservative electorate opposition, however irrational, towards making proper treatment available to low- and no-income addicts.

    It is as though some people, however precious, can tragically be consciously or subconsciously considered disposable — especially by government bean-counters — because they are debilitatedly addicted to drugs. Then those people may begin perceiving themselves as worthless and consume their addictive substances more haphazardly.

  6. I had to look this up

    Neurodivergence
    Neurodivergence is the term for when someone’s brain processes, learns, and/or behaves differently from what is considered “typical.”

    Wow, abuse wires our brain differently but yours behaves differently.

    You have survived

  7. Homelessness and addiction are rampant in my city

    It is a sad situation

    Thanks for your input

  8. Homeless citizens, including many enduring mental health tribulations (‘poor in spirit’), usually have suffered eviction. If they couldn’t afford an official residence, they therefor are, by extension, too poor to be permitted to practice what’s frequently platitudinously described as all citizens’ right to vote in elections.

    To me, it’s as though some people, however precious, can tragically be consciously or subconsciously considered disposable. Even to an otherwise democratic and relatively civilized nation, their worth(lessness) is measured basically by their ‘productivity’ or lack thereof. Then those people may begin perceiving themselves as worthless and accordingly live their daily lives more haphazardly.

  9. “abuse wires our brain differently” …

    I consider it a form of non-physical-impact brain damage. …

    If physically survived, emotional and/or psychological trauma from unhindered toxic abuse usually results in a helpless child’s brain improperly developing. If allowed to continue for a prolonged period, it can act as a starting point into a life in which the brain uncontrollably releases potentially damaging levels of inflammation-promoting stress hormones and chemicals, even in non-stressful daily routines.

  10. No one is disposable

    We journey together

  11. It’s called complex ptsd

  12. Hi Marty! Thank you for the post. I was just diagnosed with PTDS about a year ago. It’s hard to tell because my mind doesn’t hold into timelines very well. The comparison you make between a PTSD brain and regular one is interesting. Thanks for sharing!

  13. Time is distorted with ptsd

    We get confused and lost

  14. We
    Lose track of time, the order things happen around trauma and our fight or flight mechanism firing

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