PTSD: A lifetime of thoughts!


Psychologist, anxiety treatment specialist, and author, Edmund J. Bourne, Ph.D, defines Self Talk and how it works: “It is so automatic and subtle you don’t notice it or the effect it has on your moods and feelings.

It appears in telegraphic form- one short word or image (”Oh no!) contains a whole series of thoughts, memories, or associations.

Anxious self-talk is typically irrational but almost always sounds like the truth.”
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My two cents: Childhood abuse has a devastating impact on self talk and on our thoughts.

Being in constant fear a whole childhood, affects our nervous system while influencing our thoughts.

My thoughts spot danger first, then possible chances of failure coupled with a deep sense of unworthiness.

These thoughts dominate my being from time to time during the day.

Every day, trauma thoughts appear, some days are much worse than others.

These thoughts are automatic, my response has to be
quick, Powerful and focused to shut these demons down.

I fight a daily battle of bringing my mind back to this present moment then letting go.

Some days the battle is constant, worry and fear of failure have been my daily companions.

My mind is active, prone to rumination, leading to damnation.

Oh, a little gallows humor while on this crazy merry-go-round.

No matter the event or scenario, my brain automatically assesses any danger, then worries about failure or humiliation.

I can unplug this disaster at times, but look at the time wasted at 70.

Instead of enjoying happiness or this moment, I am fighting traumas damage.

How automatic are your trauma thoughts?
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3 responses to this post.

  1. Many blogs have a loose-knit community.

    Light-hearted blogs like music, flowers, nature, travel, food, etc. Have an energetic and large community.

    If you follow this blog, our community is different.

    We share many of the same challenges or obstacles daily.

    I gain strength from sharing this blog, seeing that my struggles are not solitary.

    I thought my blog was aimed at helping PTSD sufferers but instead is a healing action for me.

    The art of writing and trying to help others with my actions is a great reward in itself.

    Having others who suffer from PTSD validate your experience is important

    Therapist can not see ptsd as we do.

    We have the wisdom to share and skills we have used

    We need best practices for PTSD people

    Oh a post I see in the sentence

  2. I feel your pain Marty – although I can’t claim to feel it quite as acutely. Thank you for sharing – I admire your courage to do so. 🙏

  3. I try not to judge it

    We all have a burden

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