My take on childhood abuse’s impact on the mind and body

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Childhood abuse results in a smaller hippocampus, larger amygdala and the quarterback (left prefrontal cortex) of our mind confused and ineffective.

Our minds wired around abuse, in survival mode, so the organs responsible for regulation and safety developed differently.

So memory, emotional regulation, safety and common sense have been compromised.

If we understand these shortcomings, we can grade our thoughts on this trauma curve.

Discount everything we feel and think around our PTSD. I do not believe my PTSD thoughts.

They are inaccurate, damaging and a distant memory.

That question of why we just can not let go, is answered in the damage to these three brain organs.

If we look at the Kaiser Adverse Childhood study, cancer, disease, addiction and early death come with childhood abuse, also.

It’s just not the mind, it is the body that suffers.

So let me rejoice at my advanced age to have survived and never given up.

Few will understand how we feel, now we know our brains have physical deficiencies.

This is not to use as an excuse but wisdom to live life as fully as possible in the face of our challenges.

There will be low times of hopelessness and depression, that’s why we never give up, never give in.

I have waited out serious bouts of PTSD with triggers firing, anxiety filling my body, and fear consuming me.

These spells will break, subside and life goes back to our normal.

I still hope, but hope only has a chance with daily work and courage to risk.

We journey together on this path not on competition.

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2 responses to this post.

  1. Posted by Deb on June 25, 2021 at 6:26 pm

    This surely explains a lot that I’m constantly struggling with. My brain fog is so debilitating at times. I’ve been working on my memoir but days, sometimes weeks or months even, go by when I can’t think coherently enough to express myself. I know the words are in there somewhere. But they get scrambled. And often even when I can write, I forget from one minute to the next what I was going to write for my next sentence.

    I hate feeling stupid when I know I’m not.

  2. It’s not stupid it’s childhood abuse

    I feel ashamed a
    Little when I see my vulnerable ilities

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